The Call Center Burnout – How To Avoid It

Unemployment claims rose last week to the highest level in eight months, according to the Labor department. While all the talking heads started blathering about why (one theory is that high gas prices prompted people to stop driving to work and apply for unemployment instead…really?) the simple fact is that the economy is still in the toilet.

2) The site has no email capture mechanism. Most honest copywriters will tell you that in most Internet marketing type niches, a 1-2% response rate to a sales letter is VERY respectable. You’ve worked very hard to get visitors to your site, and if you completely ignore the 98% who don’t buy you’re not going to be in business very long.

The extra $700 is for their commission. It will obviously be harder to sell the product for the higher price, so if you do feel comfortable making the calls yourself, I’d recommend it.

Work from home opportunities are plentiful in the Call Center and customer service occupations. Some of these companies hire employees instead of contractors which could be a great benefit. All you need is a telephone line, a computer, high-speed Internet and excellent customer service skills. West at Home and 1-800-Flowers are great places to start. AT&T and SBC hire remote workers often as a transition from their St. Louis Titan Call Center Tijuana.

5) Not offering proof of statements. It’s natural for you to say how great you and your product are. Therefore, that means nothing to potential customers. Get other to share how your product improved their lives. Use media interviews, and statements by officials in professional organizations, to provide third-party validation.

“So rather than asking where [God was] on 9/11/01 perhaps a better question would be: Where am I on 9/11/11? Have I come to the realization that the world is a place of great beauty and love, and it is also the stronghold of unspeakable evil? And because of this reality, I have the highest calling and responsibility in the universe – which is to make disciples who make disciples.

Cost is clearly a factor when it comes to choosing a company to handle your customer service needs. Ask yourself if the amount you will be charged is fair for the services provided. You should also determine whether the company’s metrics are in line with the rate they charge. A company that is cheaper than the rest won’t be cost-effective if they cause you to lose customers due to poor performance.

The result? The value of each of your subscribers (on your list) skyrockets to possibly over $10 per month. Typically a subscriber is only worth between $1-$3 per month to you.